Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Workshops and......

I made another quickie pot yesterday.  I'm not really happy with it; I think because the form is way outside my comfort zone.  I added the various elements because I got to thinking about Steampunk.  The original form was made around a large plastic glass.  I think it looks sort of like 'modern' pots from the 1950's.  At any rate I'll keep it.  I will bisque it and probably stare at it for a few months before doing anything else. 



 Lori Buff posted Paul Mathieu's introduction to Art of the Future in which he states his dislike for clay workshops. Well, he seems to think they are ridiculous and a detriment to the professional clay community.  Only serious artists need apply!  

Why he singles out clay is sort of beyond me.  There is a long tradition of amateur education in the arts.  Workshops, classes, community art centers are the lifeblood of the arts.  How can you get support for anything if you make it an exclusive club?  No, not everyone is going to be a (name your favorite) and innovate and push the medium to new places, but if taking a class makes a person look at a pot, or a painting in a new light, see the need for programs in our schools, that's a good thing. (Side note:  Why are students and, yes, employees, encouraged to think creatively or outside the box, yet arts programs which are the very thing that teach creative thinking are the first to go in any budget cutting?)

There is a certain joy that can happen in a workshop when the whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts. The rhythm and knowledge that comes from a concentrated learning environment can't be beat.  Creative energy will crackle in the air and amazing things happen.  Having taught and having spoken with a lot of art teachers I can say the take home value is enormous.

And in the end....the love you take is equal to the love you make. (Paul McCartney)

Enjoy the evening and, as always.......thanks for stopping by........*s*

P.S.  I may edit and add to this one.


21 comments:

  1. AMEN! These elite artists make me want to pull out my hair! I have met most of the friends I have right now through community arts classes. The pedestals some artists get put on are just too high for me..... I'll never be up there on one of them, so I'll just have to be satisfied with being less than worthy to be called an artist I guess...

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    1. Hi Tracey.....Most of those high pedestals are occupied by the self-installed.

      I am a product of an art education, yet all my education in clay comes from my old co-op and various workshops. Somehow the two blended in the process.

      I have always hesitated to call myself an artist. To me it seemed to be presumptuous to name myself. Artist is an honorific bestowed by others when it is earned.

      So allow me to name you Artist Tracey Broome.





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  2. Dearest Suzi,
    There seems to be very serious budget cutting going on, here as well as in Western Europe. They better do some serious cutting in the way too overpaid sports business. I'd prefer art at all times. Your pot looks funny and the humor with which you write that you probably will stare at it for a couple of months...
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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    1. Hi Mariette....I have nothing against sports, but the money spent on them is mind boggling. I would like to see a sane balance.....yes, and the flying pigs are in sight.

      I have to have a certain amount of humor about my work......if we can't laugh at ourselves.....

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    2. P.S. Have you ever noticed that the kids who need sports the most are the one who are continually left out, or left behind?

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    3. Sport should be a great opportunity for all kids to learn about team building!

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  3. That would look great in Copper Adventurine: http://www.maycocolors.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=mayco_flypage.tpl&product_id=842&category_id=79&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=4

    I don't know if you used cone 6 or 10 clay, though. The Copper Adventurine is a low-fire glaze.

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    1. Hi ShellHawk.....I am strictly a low fire potter ^03 is about the highest I go. But I love the idea of copper. You are opening new doors and window for me.

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  4. Very well put! Aside from high school, I got my start in community art classes and like Tracey said, made some very good friends there.

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    1. Hi Michele....In addition to writing a reply you have to hit the publish button! Although I got most of my art education in college, all my clay education comes from my co-op classes and workshops, I must say I have never seen any real difference in the standards of teaching. One of the great things about classes and workshops is the wide variety of students. Different people, with different needs and opinions all drawn together by a basic love of clay.

      In a way the same thing happens here in the blogosphere. We are all different people who don't really know each other, but we have clay in common and that becomes a glue which brings us together.

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  5. I don't know, although I have taught beginning adults, I have never been to a class myself except drawing, which I know nothing about. People will say "oh, you could go to Penland or wherever for a clay class" and on the one hand, that is insulting to a person with 30 years experience, and on the other hand, I was taught that your professional development depends on you WORKING. The guy I apprenticed to, and is still working with 40+ years of pots behind him, would say he never had time for that sort of thing, he was too busy making and selling pots in order to buy groceries, which I agree with. I am not a social potter at all, and don't like talking work or techiniques with other potters...but ANYway, that is all just me :)

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    1. Hi Gary.....I think the learning process is a highly personal, individual experience. You say you are not a social potter and don't like talking work or techniques yet you spread information about clay and cooking and life in general in your daily blog postings. You are social in spite of yourself!

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  6. I just want to say, Well said re the importance of community participation in the arts. Our Pottery Club is important to all those who attend for many different reasons. We have the urge to be creastive in common and encourage each other to express it freely. I agree that the pedastal sitters are largely self appointed and the disdain that some areas of the arts bestow on potters is offensive. I was looking at an image of Picasso in his pottery studio yesterday, what more can I say!

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  7. By the way, I love it that the steam punk movement has moved you. I also am impressed that you slipped outside your comfort zone shape wise. Well done.

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    1. Hi JB.....I have a lot of strong feelings about how western art is seen as a hierarchy, as if some materials are more important or 'artistic' than others. As if paint isn't used on houses as well as in art....I used to love to point that out to the painters when I was in school.
      Thanks for the comments about the teapot. I have concluded that they are round for a reason...they keep the tea hotter, longer. Steampunk is cool.

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  8. Dear Suzi, all that counts is the pleasure making it! I always say it is always easy not to make/do anything! I love your pot and it has that 50ies style, indeed! Well done and go on no matter what! Christa

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    1. Hi Christa....The pleasure for me is in the making and then the pleasure it gives someone when she is using it. Thanks for stopping by. It's good to see you posting again!

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  9. '...probably stare at it for a few months before doing anything else' I do this quite often! : )

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  10. Midori....It's odd, sometimes ideas spring fully grown and I know exactly what I want from beginning to end. Other times it comes in stages, with one having to be completed before I can go on to the next.

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  11. I agree with your comments about needing creativity and yet cutting arts courses - it has happened here in Australia already and some very good teachers are out of jobs. Let us know when you have looked long enough at that teapot :^)

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    1. Hi Anna....I think creative programs are being cut world wide. I just heard about an independent school in Silicon Valley where the children of tech heads have no computers at all. There is a fear that too much tech influence will stifle creativity in later life.

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